Assignment.

If you, as a writer, don’t find the challenge of this assignment exciting, you will probably never create great fiction as an art form. The goal is to build great characters through in scene action.  If you succeed, after practicing and evaluating, your storytelling will take on new dimensions that will fascinate your readers, stimulate their memory, and stimulate their admiration for you with your ability to give them pleasure through a fictional story. That has a good chance to give you great pleasure you will probably never experience in any other way.

What to do.

Write five short scenes. Use conflict, action, dialogue, but internal reflection sparely and narrative description to a minimum.  This will characterize through action.  Rather than, She was so sad, showing through action, She sobbed, her body trembling, barely able to speak.  Expand this example to other emotions such as anger, envy, hate, love (be specific about the type of love your creating through action), et cetera as you build your character.  Keep you story moving through the five scenes, that is, don’t lose a sense of momentum because your outlining and focusing on character development.

Goal.

In five short scenes outlines, create the story so the reader will know the nature (emotional and intellectual) of the major character protagonist WITHOUT using words like mean, bully, stupid, kind, magnanimous, introspective, God fearing, religious, cruel, loving, hateful, jealous, arrogant, prideful, naive, etc. You should strive to make story and character action responsible for characterization (not narrator or author telling).  Each scene should add to the characterization of the protagonist, providing dimension and uniqueness (as ever human is unique in their own ways) to the character.  Imagine, strive for consistency, prioritize and reject for effectiveness, stay credible.  Like the uniqueness of what you create.

Word limit 2000 words (total for all five scenes) for submission.  Word limitation important to force editing and prioritization to develop crisp, concrete prose.

Submit your work to discover ways to improve.


   Work submissions for Assignment 12: Write five scene outlines

1

             After she left, I felt Heidi’s presence in every classroom, on the streetcar, and in the library. Throughout High School, I dated deadbeats, girls that clung, and girls that didn’t know a book from a brick. Heidi’s ghost shadowed me like a remnant of her soul.

            After high school, and then college, several years of independent league baseball followed. Heidi’s ghost diminished, her features eroded, and the echo of her voice faded to silence. She was old news, or so I thought.

            On a Thursday, after my third day of practice with the Class A, Graytown Tigers in Graytown, Virginia, I sat at the bar with Jackson, the only player I had befriended since I arrived. This was my first, and most likely last, chance within a major league organization. The familiar drag down feeling of a transient life weighed on me. I accepted Jackson’s invitation to eat at the Tiger Café only to please him; I expected little pleasure from the experience.

            We sat at the bar, and before long, Jackson took to the dance floor while I nursed my third beer. I noticed myself thinking of Heidi. Out of boredom, I traced the thought back in my mind, wondering what brought it on. There had been a rush of movement across the bar, a waitress who caught my attention. She had brushed her hair back from her face with an unusual wrist flick, the same way Heidi did it.

            As if she sensed my interest, she looked across the room at me—stared at me, to be exact. I looked away. Large, brown eyes—another similarity.

 

2

            At practice, onlookers splattered about the stands: old-timers, small town onlookers, and girlfriends or young wives of my teammates. I buried my self-consciousness in the reaction to the batted ball, the smoothness of running down a sure hit, and in the coordination engaged in making a catch, until suddenly I tensed. I dropped an easy fly and threw the ball to the wrong base. After practice, I sat in the dugout, removing my spikes.

            Coach Russell approached from the third base line. “You looked confused out there today, Tyler. Something botherin you?” He spoke down to me, perched above the dugout, his hands gripping the railing.

            My cheeks flushed and my nose ran. I wiped it with the back of my sleeve. “No sir. Sorry, I’ll do better tomorrow.”

            He bit at his cuticles. “I hope we didn’t make a mistake, bringing you in from Florida. The scouts said you were ready.”

            His voice hit me like a punch in the stomach. “No mistake, sir. Give me a chance to prove it.”

            His face was a stone. Turning away, he said, “Quit callin me sir. Coach is fine. Just do better tomorrow.”

            All my teammates had gone but I knew I’d find them at the Tiger Café, if I wanted to. I wasn’t in the mood. Besides, I hadn’t gotten to know anyone except Jackson. This team seemed different from any other I had played on. Camaraderie mixed with the taste of distrustfulness, like a sour paste stuck on the roof of my mouth. Players worried that the new guy coming up would ruin their chances.

            I threw my spikes into my bag, flipped it over my shoulder and headed for home, an old house converted for ballplayers, where the newbies stayed.

 

3

            A spunky-looking, gum-chewing girl sat alone in the stands. “Hey,” she called. I recognized her as the waitress from the café.

            I nodded, but kept walking.

            She jumped up, and jogged towards me, her dark hair, flapping about her shoulders. “You looked pretty good out there, she said.” Her brown-sparkle eyes gleamed.

            “You might be the only one who thinks so.” I kept moving. It wasn’t something I wanted to talk about.

            She cut me off, forcing me to stop, sticking her hands into the back pockets of her denim bell bottoms, stretching the fabric of her shirt tightly across her ample chest.          

            “Oh. Coach Russell. Don’t worry about him. He tries to scare all the new boys. He’ll stop barking at you. And he doesn’t bite.” She blew a bubble that broke. She casually scrapped it off her face, and then plunked it back into her mouth.

            Slowly licking her lips, she trifled with me, measuring my reaction. It had been a long time since I’d been with a girl. I tugged at my collar, dropped my gaze and gawked at her breasts.

            “What do you know about it?”

            She took my chin in both hands and lifted my face back to her wide eyes. “I know all about this team. My old boyfriend played here for three years, but he moved on to AA, so I’m checking out the new players. You’re first on my list.”

            Apparently, she thought I should be flattered.

            “You’re rather bold, aren’t you?” I thought she was putting me on, that there would be a punch line, or some friends of hers would come out from behind the fence and start laughing. She was too old for that kind of nonsense, but her manner reminded me of a high school cheerleader. I felt old in her presence, although we had to be close to the same age.

            “No use beating around the bush. You could take me…if you want.” She bobbed up and down on her toes as if she were wearing coils in her shoes, “take me to the café for something to eat.”

            After the mugging I got from Coach Russell, I felt open to any brand of kindness. I reached out to touch her face, but stopped.

            “You’re on,” I said.

            “Great. My name’s Nashla Lamont,” she said, extending her hand.

            She gripped firmly, caressing my knuckles.

            “I’m Vance.”

            “I know,” she said. “Vance Tyler, I looked it up.” She laughed at my surprise and blew another bubble.

            “Nashla, that’s different.”

            “I hate my real name. I call myself Nashla, after my grandmother. Nash is her maiden name.”

            “It’ unique, like you.”

            She smiled and tilted her gaze downward, but I could see I’d touched her.

 

4

            Loud music blasted through the open door.

            “Oh! I like this song,” Nashla said. She started dancing at the doorway, mouthing the words…”we were gettin our share.”

            Everybody knew her—a couple of young woman in a booth, a guy with a reddish beard sitting at the bar, and Hernandez, one of the ballplayers, who had been with the team since last year. Nashla beamed, clearly in her glory.

            I should have gone home, to nurse my anxiety over Coach Russell’s criticism. Instead, I said, “You know a lot of people.”

            “It’s a small town. Everybody knows everybody. Isn’t it great?”

            “Sure,” I said, but my voice fell flat.    

            “I saw you last night. You seem different and you’re cute. That’s why I scouted you out.”

            Different from whom, I wondered. “Scout me out? It sounds like you work for the team.”

            “That’s a joke, silly. I’ve lived too long in a baseball town. There’s a table, back there,” Nashla indicated with a tip of her head.

            She led me to a small table set for two, tucked in a niche, away from the hub drub. “This is nice,” I said.

            “Nashla, who’s your friend?” The voice sailed over my shoulder from behind. A waitress came into view, wearing a Tiger team shirt, faded bells, and a Tiger cap.

            “Hey Marsha, this is Vance.”

            She was taller than Nashla, blonde, with blue eyes.

            The girls chatted while I eyed the menu, getting hungrier by the minute. I didn’t catch the drift of conversation, except the last of it, “The divorce should go through in a couple of weeks,” Nashla was saying, with a scowl.

            At the risk of sounding rude, I butted in, “How many wings do you get in an order?”

            Nashla looked at me in surprise, as if she had forgotten me.

            “Oh, sorry,” Marsha said. “Hungry boy you got here, Nashla.”

            The beer and wings came out. Nashla took out her gum and saved it on her plate, laughing. “I might want that later, she said.

            I shrugged and took a sip of beer.

            Licking sauce off her fingers, she ignored my silence and asked, “So, Vance, where are you from?”

            My shoulders loosened. “I grew up in Pittsburgh, went to college in Florida.”

            Nashla’s face lit up. “I went to Daytona on spring break my senior year in High School. It was wild. Connie’s family had a Condo there. Her parents were cool. They let four of us girls stay there alone. We met up with some guys and partied the whole week.” She covered her mouth with her hand. “Uh, do you have a girlfriend back in Pittsburgh, or somewhere?”

            “No. What about you. You said your boyfriend moved up to AA?”

            “Oh, you mean Derrick. Did I tell you about him? He thinks he’s going to be a big star, but it took him three years to get to AA. He wanted me to go with him, but all my friends are here.”

            “How’d he take it?”

            Her face grayed over. “Hey, what’s your favorite song?”

            Guess she didn’t want to talk about past history. I took the last bite of my burger and poured half a glass, emptying the pitcher. Nashla had drunk most of the beer.

            I stared at my plate, preparing an excuse to go. But just then, she looked at me with her baby-face eyes that reminded me of Heidi. Just like that, I changed my mind. It didn’t matter that she was like a child at play. Marsha came by and cleared the plates. A fresh pitcher of beer and the opportunity to have Nashla lay on the table. She eyed me, as if expecting something, but I just sat there.

 

5

            She asked me to dance. The air reeked of perspiration and the floor was sticky with beer. We danced to near exhaustion. Her bangs stuck to her forehead and sweat marks swelled under her arms.

             I got us a couple more beers. She came back from the ladies room looking more put together. She swapped a knowing look with Marsha.

            A slow song came on and I held Nashla close. We were wet with sweat, but I welcomed the heat of her body, and she pressed herself tightly to me. She whispered something in my ear but I couldn’t hear what she said, so she took my hand and led me outside. “Walk me home? She asked.

            She lived three blocks from the café in the upstairs of a two bedroom duplex. The walk was a tango of anticipative foreplay. She wrapped her arm around my waist and I hugged her shoulder. Like love-tied teens, we made awkward progress, more concerned with our touching than our mobility. I rubbed her head, messing her hair, and reached around to her face, pulling the hair away from her cheek, and touching her lips with the tip of my finger. She bit me, lightly, and licked my fingertip.

            When we reached her door, she kissed me. Soft lips overlaid mine, her tongue on a quest. I grabbed her hair, pulling her away to kiss her neck. She moaned and then pushed me back and smiled.

            She flicked her hair. “Come on in.”

            But then Heidi came to mind. “No. I don’t think so.”

            Nashla’s eyebrows squished together. “You don’t want to?”

            I shifted my feet. “I’ve got practice tomorrow.”

            Her face turned red. “I see.” She slipped inside and closed the door with exacting gentleness.

            “No, I didn’t mean…”      

            The lock clicked.

            It was a long five blocks back to my house. I realized that I actually liked her. It wasn’t her fault that a few of her incidental qualities brought back memories. Heidi heartache, after all these years—I was a basket case.

Instructor Response

1

             After she left, I felt Heidi’s presence in every classroom, on the streetcar, and in the library. Throughout High School, I dated deadbeats, girls that clung, and girls that didn’t know a book from a brick. Heidi’s ghost shadowed me like a remnant of her soul.

            After high school, and then college, several years of independent league baseball followed. Heidi’s ghost diminished, her features eroded, and the echo of her voice faded to silence. She was old news, or so I thought.

            On a Thursday, after my third day of practice with the Class A, Graytown Tigers in Graytown, Virginia, I sat at the bar with Jackson, the only player I had befriended since I arrived. This was my first, and most likely last, chance within a major league organization. The familiar drag down feeling of a transient life weighed on me. I accepted Jackson’s invitation to eat at the Tiger Café only to please him; I expected little pleasure from the experience.

            We sat at the bar, and before long, Jackson took to the dance floor while I nursed my third beer. I noticed myself thinking of Heidi. Out of boredom, I traced the thought back in my mind, wondering what brought it on. There had been a rush of movement across the bar, a waitress who caught my attention. She had brushed her hair back from her face with an unusual wrist flick, the same way Heidi did it.

            As if she sensed my interest, she looked across the room at me—stared at me, to be exact. I looked away. Large, brown eyes—another similarity.

 

2

            At practice, onlookers splattered about the stands: old-timers, small town onlookers, and girlfriends or young wives of my teammates. I buried my self-consciousness in the reaction to the batted ball, the smoothness of running down a sure hit, and in the coordination engaged in making a catch, until suddenly I tensed. I dropped an easy fly and threw the ball to the wrong base. After practice, I sat in the dugout, removing my spikes.

            Coach Russell approached from the third base line. “You looked confused out there today, Tyler. Something botherin you?” He spoke down to me, perched above the dugout, his hands gripping the railing.  Nice image.

            My cheeks flushed and my nose ran. I wiped it with the back of my sleeve. “No sir. Sorry, I’ll do better tomorrow.”

            He bit at his cuticles. “I hope we didn’t make a mistake, bringing you in from Florida. The scouts said you were ready.”

            His voice hit me like a punch in the stomach. “No mistake, sir. Give me a chance to prove it.”

            His face was a stone. Turning away, he said, “Quit callin me sir. Coach is fine. Just do better tomorrow.”  Yes.  Nice conflict producing lots of characterization well seeded in dialogue response.

            All my teammates had gone but I knew I’d find them at the Tiger Café, if I wanted to. I wasn’t in the mood. Besides, I hadn’t gotten to know anyone except Jackson. This team seemed different from any other I had played on. Camaraderie mixed with the taste of distrustfulness, like a sour paste stuck on the roof of my mouth. Players worried that the new guy coming up would ruin their chances.

            I threw my spikes into my bag, flipped it over my shoulder and headed for home, an old house converted for ballplayers, where the newbies stayed.

 

3

            A spunky-looking, gum-chewing girl sat alone in the stands. “Hey,” she called. I recognized her as the waitress from the café.

            I nodded, but kept walking.

            She jumped up, and jogged towards me, her dark hair, flapping about her shoulders. “You looked pretty good out there, she said.” Her brown-sparkle eyes gleamed.

            “You might be the only one who thinks so.” I kept moving. It wasn’t something I wanted to talk about.

            She cut me off, forcing me to stop, sticking her hands into the back pockets of her denim bell bottoms, stretching the fabric of her shirt tightly across her ample chest.    Good.      

            “Oh. Coach Russell. Don’t worry about him. He tries to scare all the new boys. He’ll stop barking at you. And he doesn’t bite.” She blew a bubble that broke. She casually scrapped it off her face, and then plunked it back into her mouth.

            Slowly licking her lips, she trifled with me, measuring my reaction. It had been a long time since I’d been with a girl. I tugged at my collar, dropped my gaze and gawked at her breasts.

            “What do you know about it?” I asked.  [Needs attribution for clarity about who’s taling.]

            She took my chin in both hands and lifted my face back to her wide eyes. “I know all about this team. My old boyfriend played here for three years, but he moved on to AA, so I’m checking out the new players. You’re first on my list.”

            Apparently, she thought I should be flattered.

            “You’re rather bold, aren’t you?” I thought she was putting me on, that there would be a punch line, or some friends of hers would come out from behind the fence and start laughing. She was too old for that kind of nonsense, but her manner reminded me of a high school cheerleader. I felt old in her presence, although we had to be close to the same age.

            “No use beating around the bush. You could take me…if you want.” She bobbed up and down on her toes as if she were wearing coils in her shoes, “take me to the café for something to eat.”

            After the mugging I got from Coach Russell, I felt open to any brand of kindness. I reached out to touch her face, but stopped.

            “You’re on,” I said.

            “Great. My name’s Nashla Lamont,” she said, extending her hand.

            She gripped firmly, caressing my knuckles.

            “I’m Vance.”

            “I know,” she said. “Vance Tyler, I looked it up.” She laughed at my surprise and blew another bubble.  Nicely done exposition (in 1st person too).

            “Nashla, that’s different.”

            “I hate my real name. I call myself Nashla, after my grandmother. Nash is her maiden name.”

            “It’ unique, like you.”

            She smiled and tilted her gaze downward, but I could see I’d touched her.

 

4

            Loud music blasted through the open door.

            “Oh! I like this song,” Nashla said. She started dancing at the doorway, mouthing the words…”we were gettin our share.”

            Everybody knew her—a couple of young woman in a booth, a guy with a reddish beard sitting at the bar, and Hernandez, one of the ballplayers, who had been with the team since last year. Nashla beamed, clearly in her glory.

            I should have gone home, to nurse my anxiety over Coach Russell’s criticism. Instead, I said, “You know a lot of people.”

            “It’s a small town. Everybody knows everybody. Isn’t it great?”

            “Sure,” I said, but my voice fell flat.    

            “I saw you last night. You seem different and you’re cute. That’s why I scouted you out.”

            Different from whom, I wondered. “Scout me out? It sounds like you work for the team.”

            “That’s a joke, silly. I’ve lived too long in a baseball town. There’s a table, back there,” Nashla indicated with a tip of her head.

            She led me to a small table set for two, tucked in a niche, away from the hub drub. “This is nice,” I said.  This is very well paced.

            “Nashla, who’s your friend?” The voice sailed over my shoulder from behind. A waitress came into view, wearing a Tiger team shirt, faded bells, and a Tiger cap.

            “Hey Marsha, this is Vance.”

            She was taller than Nashla, blonde, with blue eyes.

            The girls chatted while I eyed the menu, getting hungrier by the minute. I didn’t catch the drift of conversation, except the last of it, “The divorce should go through in a couple of weeks,” Nashla was saying, with a scowl.

            At the risk of sounding rude, I butted in, “How many wings do you get in an order?”

            Nashla looked at me in surprise, as if she had forgotten me.

            “Oh, sorry,” Marsha said. “Hungry boy you got here, Nashla.”

            The beer and wings came out. Nashla took out her gum and saved it on her plate, laughing. “I might want that later, she said.  Nice.

            I shrugged and took a sip of beer.

            Licking sauce off her fingers, she ignored my silence and asked, “So, Vance, where are you from?”

            My shoulders loosened. “I grew up in Pittsburgh, went to college in Florida.”  Good.  Exposition embedded in story in dialogue that calls no attention to itself.  This skill helps make this as good as it is.

            Nashla’s face lit up. “I went to Daytona on spring break my senior year in High School. It was wild. Connie’s This is, I think, a new character which raises expectations of more to come or some purpose.  Maybe “I had this friend whose” family had a Condo there. Her parents were cool. They let four of us girls stay there alone. We met up with some guys and partied the whole week.” She covered her mouth with her hand. “Uh, do you have a girlfriend back in Pittsburgh, or somewhere?”

            “No. What about you. You said your boyfriend moved up to AA?”

            “Oh, you mean Derrick. Did I tell you about him? He thinks he’s going to be a big star, but it took him three years to get to AA. He wanted me to go with him, but all my friends are here.”  Great.

            “How’d he take it?”

            Her face grayed over. “Hey, what’s your favorite song?”

            Guess she didn’t want to talk about past history. I took the last bite of my burger and poured half a glass, emptying the pitcher. Nashla had drunk most of the beer.

            I stared at my plate, preparing an excuse to go. But just then, she looked at me with her baby-face eyes that reminded me of Heidi. Just like that, I changed my mind. It didn’t matter that she was like a child at play. Marsha came by and cleared the plates. A fresh pitcher of beer and the opportunity to have Nashla lay on the table????. She eyed me, as if expecting something, but I just sat there.

 

5

            She asked me to dance. The air reeked of perspiration and the floor was sticky with beer. We danced to near exhaustion. Her bangs stuck to her forehead and sweat marks swelled under her arms.

             I got us a couple more beers. She came back from the ladies room looking more put together. She swapped a knowing look with Marsha.

            A slow song came on and I held Nashla close. We were wet with sweat, but I welcomed the heat of her body, and she pressed herself tightly to me. She whispered something in my ear but I couldn’t hear what she said, so she took my hand and led me outside. “Walk me home? She asked.

            She lived three blocks from the café in the upstairs of a two bedroom duplex. The walk was a tango of anticipative foreplay. She wrapped her arm around my waist and I hugged her shoulder. Like love-tied teens, we made awkward progress, more concerned with our touching than our mobility. I rubbed her head, messing her hair, and reached around to her face, pulling the hair away from her cheek, and touching her lips with the tip of my finger. She bit me, lightly, and licked my fingertip.

            When we reached her door, she kissed me. Soft lips overlaid mine, her tongue on a quest. I grabbed her hair, pulling her away to kiss her neck. She moaned and then pushed me back and smiled.

            She flicked her hair. “Come on in.”

            But then Heidi came to mind. “No. I don’t think so.”

            Nashla’s eyebrows squished together. “You don’t want to?”

            I shifted my feet. “I’ve got practice tomorrow.”

            Her face turned red. “I see.” She slipped inside and closed the door with exacting gentleness.

            “No, I didn’t mean…”      

            The lock clicked.

            It was a long five blocks back to my house. I realized that I actually liked her. It wasn’t her fault that a few of her incidental qualities brought back memories. Heidi heartache, after all these years—I was a basket case.

 

Very well done.  You’ve accomplished everything the assignment asked and then some.  Let me dwell on the story for a moment.  The time period is a couple of days with a couple of quick flashbacks, all well done with excellent pacing.  But the ending may not please most readers.  It’s a shock and it doesn’t seem logical that it happens so fast.  (I know you were limited on words, but the comment isn’t totally related to that restriction.)  Couple of thoughts.   Why doesn’t Nashla fight back a little?  Passive acceptance doesn’t fit the characterization that comes before.  She’s uniquely fiesty and determined.  And why does the protagonist reject her?  He hasn’t thought about Heidi for many paragraphs; in fact, he’s only been thinking about Nashla and his growing need for her to replace what he lost with Heidi’s loss.  If he’s going to reject Nashla, I would suggest he be in conflict the entire time Nashla is doing her seductive stuff.  Rather than just enjoying the seduction (and forgetting Heidi) could their be conflict in him?  Pleasure/guilt.  You could do it in dialogue or internalization effectively, I think.  So if you had Nashla fighting against his rejection of her, and him with this great, unsolved question of whether he is willing to cheat on his memory of Heidi, the rejection makes sense, reader feels sympathy for Nashla, and shares protagonist’s decision.  Having said that, I’d also consider a different ending–his going into the apartment with Nashla based on resolution of his conflict with the Heidi of the past and make it a resolution that is sort of an epiphany for him . . . he realizes life has to go on, and there’s this girl who’s offering him love, and he actually grows as a living human from his grief-oriented reclusive, unhappy existence to accept and return that love.  [Consider how this changes him rather than keeping his emotional and psychological state unchanged.]  Then, if he’s changed by Nashla to again be able to feel in a guiltless way, what if the ending included in the story his success in baseball, at least pleasing the coach a little.  A revelation to the reader that his holding onto the grief was the cause for his failure on the athletic field.  It could be a revelation that had some universality to it, something a reader could think about—emotions can restrict humans in negative ways and humans grow by making the right choices about how they handle their emotions.  Of course, this may not be what you’re about and ignore it for your story if that’s true.  But still, see the possible advantages of working through the characterization and emotional states you created so well and consider the movement of those emotions and the story-logical resolution of the conflicts the emotions represent.  Protagonist: grief and guilt–> to love and acceptance of criticism and doing something about it.  Nashla: loneliness, unfulfilled need, basic lack of self worth–>to self pride in attracting her man and catching him, advancement of self worth.

Great work.  Thanks for doing the assignment!

Bill Coles

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She was driving back home and on her way from the hospital, when she looked herself up in the front view mirror, noticing the glamorous smile surfacing her lips from beneath her heart, and reflecting across the shiny surface. “I am in heaven” She happily thought. The world was a happier place for delivering her an extraordinary joy, and a remarkable feeling that she herself could not explain. Not enough words in the universe seemed sufficient to portray the glowing sparks in her eyes, or the rosy hint that covered her pink cheeks. She have waited so long to receive the miracle of life and now that she has, she was granted the best of gifts, yet the most blessed one of all. Perhaps her unique silence was the best artistic painting to have presented her joyful sense of living, without the speech of words to caption it. 

The minute she pulled in her driveway, her heart skipped a beat, when she spotted a yellow envelope on the front door, waiting for her to uncover its content. The return address label read her husband’s lawyer mailing information, and that could not have been a good sign. Suddenly and without a previous warning, she panicked as she stood in silence holding the intact object hesitating to open it. Perhaps it was a random application request of some kind she thought, but if that was the case, she wouldn’t be shaking the way she was while debating between tearing in it open, or forever tossing it away. Fifteen minutes later, she found herself sitting down on the from door steps reading through the endless yet sore words that were printed all over her the place. “I can’t believe this is happening to me.. I must be dreaming.” She switched to denial mode. Her hands shivered with a sudden coldness before running through her weak spine for a final dose of agony.  Her heart was racing the infinite finish line, while her breath choked her in the throat, pulling her closer to the approaching cliff of hell.

Feeling nothing but the numbness of death, she dropped the cursed journal of the past five years of her life, leaving it behind to burn up the future of dreams without a single fight. She was no longer the vivid sunshine of the skies, nor the fresh breeze of wind. In a blink of an eye she was nothing more than a tormented soul, dying of a compassionate thirst and a merciful hunger. Letting go of the one man she truly loved, was the last nail in her coffin, drilling through her bones with misery and regret. He left her without closure, but this time, he left forever. There was no going back regardless of the passionate feelings that she carried around for him, and only him throughout the years. Perhaps she was kidding herself all along, and now that the picture of her failed marriage became so clear, she knew that they will no longer ravel the imaginary relationship of theirs when in fact she was the only one who tried her best and beyond to overcome his infidelity and foxy lies. Although he did not deserve her pure love, he was the love of her life, even when she wasn’t his. “This must be the end. I can feel it approaching.”

With heavy pains and a greater agony, she dragged her overwhelmed feet along the sidewalk of the unknown path, hoping to find the proper place to breakdown at, when she looked around her to find herself standing over the mighty bridge. Beneath the solid structure that she was standing over, lied the deep water of the sailing sea. The waves had an outrageous breakdown of their own while screaming to claim justice. Her tears were still intact in the nest of fear, the fear of following her natural instincts. Although she forced herself to cry and release all of her anger and grief, she could not shed a single tear. Her spirit was broken, rather empty of emotions while she was in desperate need of crying her pains out loud. “Perhaps I don’t have to live through this pain. Perhaps there is a way to end it.” She then surrendered to her ugly fate.

Suddenly, the happy world of hers became a living nightmare when white clouds turned black, and day light turned into night. Having served with divorce papers just minutes after learning that she was expecting, was not at all expected. Would it be justice for her to fight the battle of becoming a parent all on her own? She couldn’t dare to ask herself that question, afraid to learn the answer. Would it be fair to use the unborn child as bate to keep the marriage from falling apart yet again? And who knows for how long this time. Sure enough it wouldn’t, and not because she didn’t love him enough to try and make it work, but because her self-esteem and mainly her pride have suffered enough through the process of reconciliation, and on more than one occasion. Therefore enough was enough already. Perhaps she felt a sudden urge to save herself from falling apart, on some superficial level she wanted to sink down deeper, and forever end her pain. 

“Forgive me God, for I have sinned.” Knowing she was walking the last steps of her long road, she closed her eyes so tightly, held in her breath for one last time, while secretly wishing for the traveling waves to catch her when she falls. She walked close to the edge, holding her broken heart inside her trembling hands, feeling the cold breeze brushing through her hair, before jumped into the deep waters. Not only that she hit rock bottom, she was now drifting into the underworld of the greater sea, unaware of her dusky destination, yet alone her secret pain which was about to affirm for her, her written destiny. Broken in heart and spirit, she sailed away behind the ocean, folding with each passing wave a painful chapter of the life, in which herself decided to finish, before the approaching of the ending.

Best,

Ramona 

Instructor Response

She was driving back home and on her way from the hospital, when she looked herself up in the front view mirror, noticing the glamorous smile surfacing her lips from beneath her heart, and reflecting across the shiny surface. “I am in heaven” She happily thought. The world was a happier place for delivering her an extraordinary joy, and a remarkable feeling that she herself could not explain. Not enough words in the universe seemed sufficient to portray the glowing sparks in her eyes, or the rosy hint that covered her pink cheeks. She have waited so long to receive the miracle of life and now that she has, she was granted the best of gifts, yet the most blessed one of all. Perhaps her unique silence was the best artistic painting to have presented her joyful sense of living, without the speech of words to caption it.  (Nice.  You’ve introduced your character and reader knows about her.  Great.)

 

The minute she pulled in her driveway, her heart skipped a beat, when she spotted a yellow envelope on the front door, waiting for her to uncover its content. The return address label read her husband’s lawyer mailing information, and that could not have been a good sign. Suddenly and without a previous warning, she panicked as she stood in silence holding the intact object hesitating to open it. Perhaps it was it a random application request?  of some kind she thought, but if that was the case, she wouldn’t be shaking the way she was while debating between tearing in it open, or forever tossing it away. Fifteen minutes later, she found herself sitting down on the from door steps reading through the endless yet sore words that were printed all over her the place. “I can’t believe this is happening to me.. I must be dreaming.” She switched to denial mode. Her hands shivered with a sudden coldness before running through her weak spine for a final dose of agony.  Her heart was racing the infinite finish line, while her breath choked her in the throat, pulling her closer to the approaching cliff of hell.

 

Feeling nothing but the numbness of death, she dropped the cursed journal of the past five years of her life, leaving it behind to burn up the future of dreams without a single fight. She was no longer the vivid sunshine of the skies, nor the fresh breeze of wind. In a blink of an eye she was nothing more than a tormented soul, dying of a compassionate thirst and a merciful hunger. Letting go of the one man she truly loved, was the last nail in her coffin, (cliché)  drilling through her bones with misery and regret. He left her without closure, but this time, he left forever. There was no going back regardless of the passionate feelings that she carried around for him, and only him throughout the years. Perhaps she was kidding herself all along, and now that the picture of her failed marriage became so clear, she knew that they will no longer ravel the imaginary relationship (is this true?)  of theirs when in fact she was the only one who tried her best and beyond to overcome his infidelity and foxy lies. Although he did not deserve her pure love, he was the love of her life, even when she wasn’t his. “This must be the end. I can feel it approaching.”

 

With heavy pains and a greater agony, she dragged her overwhelmed feet along the sidewalk of the unknown path, hoping to find the proper place to breakdown at, when she looked around her to find herself standing over the mighty bridge. Beneath the solid structure that she was standing over, lied lay (learn and use the differences between the verbs lie and lay) the deep water of the sailing sea. The waves had an outrageous breakdown of their own while screaming to claim justice. Her tears were still intact in the nest of fear, the fear of following her natural instincts. Although she forced herself to cry and release all of her anger and grief, she could not shed a single tear. Her spirit was broken, rather empty of emotions while she was in desperate need of crying her pains out loud. “Perhaps I don’t have to live through this pain. Perhaps there is a way to end it.” She then surrendered to her ugly fate.

 

Suddenly, the happy world of hers became a living nightmare when white clouds turned black, and day light turned into night. Having served with divorce papers just minutes after learning that she was expecting, was not at all expected. Would it be justice for her to fight the battle of becoming a parent all on her own? She couldn’t dare to ask herself that question, afraid to learn the answer. Would it be fair to use the unborn child as bate to keep the marriage from falling apart yet again? And who knows for how long this time. Sure enough it wouldn’t, and not because she didn’t love him enough to try and make it work, but because her self-esteem and mainly her pride have suffered enough through the process of reconciliation, and on more than one occasion. Therefore enough was enough already. Perhaps she felt a sudden urge to save herself from falling apart, on some superficial level she wanted to sink down deeper, and forever end her pain. 

 

“Forgive me God, for I have sinned.” Knowing she was walking the last steps of her long road, she closed her eyes so tightly, held in her breath for one last time, while secretly wishing for the traveling waves to catch her when she falls. She walked close to the edge, holding her broken heart inside her trembling hands, feeling the cold breeze brushing through her hair, before jumped into the deep waters. Not only that she hit rock bottom, she was now drifting into the underworld of the greater sea, unaware of her dusky destination, yet alone her secret pain which was about to affirm for her, her written destiny. Broken in heart and spirit, she sailed away behind the ocean, folding with each passing wave a painful chapter of the life, in which herself decided to finish, before the approaching of the ending.

 

Wow!  Reader feels her dilemmas and her pains.  You have a delightful, poetic style rich with metaphors, images, and passionate language.  Conflict well established.  All nicely accomplished.

 

Your story base is: girl gets divorce papers.  She’s pregnant and her husband does not know.  She kills herself.  The structure is telling moment in a few minutes of a woman’s life, providing for the reader through lyrical prose about how the woman is thinking and feeling and how she comes to the kill herself.  Effective for many readers.  But some readers may feel the piece is overwritten.  Too much flowery language mixed with clichés and metaphors that strain to be admired.  I’ve deleted some of what I felt wasn’t needed.  I think more could be done by an objective editor.  But most of all, I think you should run this piece by as many people whose opinions you can trust for the effect it has on them.  Go to a workshop where students critique.  Or ask friends.  Do the know what’s going on?  Do they like my style and story or would they suggest changes in style or story that would make them remember the piece and read it over and over for enjoyment?  What would they suggest? 

 

All writers have readers.  Writers need to find who those readers are and what they enjoy.  Every writer has many readers who do not like their writing for all sorts of reasons: they don’t like certain types of authors, they don’t like specific genres that are different than yours but still feel free to criticize, they are offended by content, the don’t like mystic reality, etc.  Those readers should be listened to but not necessarily change the writer’s style or writing.  For valuable comments as a beginning writer, find those readers who are your readers, and then listen to them closely for clues as to what you need to do to please them.

 

Great work!

 

Bill Coles

  1. I am glad I was able to deliver what I learned from your assignment. I agree with you on sharing my writing with others, and allowing them to critique the work. Frankly, I am having a hard time targeting the right audience. My family and friends are always supportive in their feedback, which is great. They seem to like what they read, but at the same time I don’t feel the satisfaction because I don’t get to hear the negative angle, and I know it exists. No one is perfect, so why should my writing be? You are the first person to give me an honest review, whether by highlighting the pros or pointing out the cons of my work, and truthfully I am very grateful.

    Thanks.

    Best,
    Ramona

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